Department Evolutionary Genetics

Department Evolutionary Genetics

The group of Diethard Tautz is interested in the identification and characterization of genes involved in adaptation processes using the house mouse (Mus musculus) as a model system. It applies a broad range of genomic techniques, but also behavioral, morphological and mapping approaches. The characterization of the identified genes includes experiments in semi-natural environments.

Current research of the department is organized in many major projects, which investigate amongst others selective sweep analysis, copy-number evolution, morphology and genes, parallel selection mapping, mating and utrasound communication and de-novo evolution of genes. [more]
Research in the fledgling bioinformatics group is focused on two topics: computational genomics and speciation. In computational genomics we use modern string algorithms based on suffix trees to compare closely related genomes. [more]
The group's research aims at understanding evolution at the molecular level using statistics and bioinformatics. We use population genetics and phylogenetic approaches to understand the evolution of molecular sequences at distinct levels: genes, genomes, RNA, proteins. We make an extensive use of complete genome sequences, gene family databases, (single cell) RNA sequencing datasets, models of protein structures, gene networks, etc. [more]
Research interests of the Research Group Meiotic Recombination and Genome Instability revolve around meiotic recombination, the regulation of accurate recombination placement and its impact on genome dynamics. We use single-molecule and small-pool allele-specific PCR approaches to study de-novo recombination in germ cells. We then apply this knowledge to computational approaches to understand how meiotic recombination shapes the genome. [more]
The main topic of the group is to understand the causes and consequences of individual variation. Individual differences have a genetic basis but are also caused by early environmental experiences. The non-genetic influence of the parental phenotype contributes strongly to the early environmental experience, and such transgenerational (epigenetic) effects may even resemble heritable (genetic) effects. Studying individual differences in physiology, development and behaviour, its plasticity and flexibility enables us to understand how individuals, populations and species cope with and adapt to short- and long-term fluctuations and changes in their environment. [more]
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