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New director starts at the institute

Profile of the institute

The Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology consists of the three departments Evolutionary Ecology, Evolutionary Genetics and Evolutionary Theory. The fourth department Microbial Population Biology is currently building up.

It is focused on basic research to unravel general evolutionary processes, such as ecological adaptations, benefits of sexual reproduction or evolution of cooperation. The scope of the work includes ecological, organismic, molecular and theoretical approaches.
John Baines, Professor of Evolutionary Genomics at the Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel and head of the research group for Evolutionary Biology at the Max Planck Institute in Plön, did receive one of the so-called "Schleswig-Holstein Excellence-Chairs".

Prof. Dr. John Baines receives one out of eight "SH-Chairs"

John Baines, Professor of Evolutionary Genomics at the Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel and head of the research group for Evolutionary Biology at the Max Planck Institute in Plön, did receive one of the so-called "Schleswig-Holstein Excellence-Chairs".
The biologist Dr. Tobias Kaiser has been at the institute in Plön since autumn 2016 and is currently developing his own independent Max Planck research group.Their goal is to determine the molecular basis of the circalunar clock, which, in contrast to the day-night rhythm (circadian clock) is still very little known. At the same time, the members of the research group are investigating how evolution shapes such biological clocks and thus adapts temporal adaptations to specific locations or habitats.As a model organism the marine midge Clunio marinus is used, which allows both questions to be pursued at the same time.

Max Planck Research Group
"Biological Clocks"

The biologist Dr. Tobias Kaiser has been at the institute in Plön since autumn 2016 and is currently developing his own independent Max Planck research group.

Their goal is to determine the molecular basis of the circalunar clock, which, in contrast to the day-night rhythm (circadian clock) is still very little known. At the same time, the members of the research group are investigating how evolution shapes such biological clocks and thus adapts temporal adaptations to specific locations or habitats.

As a model organism the marine midge Clunio marinus is used, which allows both questions to be pursued at the same time.
 
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